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Guide to English and Welsh Lights.

This guide is not intended to be an authoritative work on the primary and secondary lights - there are many good books already written on this subject. It is intended to give the reader a county by county location and brief details of past and current lights that I have considered worth recording.

This guide starts with the first lighthouse in England on the North East coast and travels clockwise around the country finishing with the last lighthouse in England on the North West coast.

It is up to the reader to establish whether or not access to the light is permitted and if access is allowed, then how to get to them.

Spurn


Berwick, Northumberland.
A tall stone circular tapering tower lighthouse with a window for a light and painted red at the base for the first 1/3 rd of the tower, white for the remaining 2/3rd with a red conical roof of a single piece of stone. Currently operated by the local Port Authority the light is situated at the end of the breakwater. Built in 1826 the tower in 44 feet high and the light is visible for 12 miles.


Lindisfarne, Northumberland.
Two tall stone obelisk lighthouses, known as East Old Law beacon and West Old Law beacon currently operated by Trinity House since 1995 and situated on Guile Point on the approach to Lindisfarne Bay. Built 1860 the towers are 70 feet and 83 feet high set at 1222 yards apart.


Bamburgh, Northumberland.
A square white painted box shaped tower lighthouse with the light on top enclosed in a black cylinder currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the shore edge at Black Rock Point. The adjacent original black painted 42 feet high circular metal open ironwork light was discontinued and removed in 1975. At the same time this disused carbide store, built in 1909 at a height of 36 feet, had the light added. The light is visible for 12 miles.


Longstone, Farne Islands.
A distinctive red and white painted rough stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and a smaller tower and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House. This lighthouse is situated on Longstone Island, one of the Farne Islands and at 6 miles is the furthest from the shore. Built in 1826 the tower is 85 feet high and the light is visible for 29 miles.


Brownsman Island, Farne Islands.
The lighthouse was built in 1791 and was 21 feet square in section rising to 30 feet with an external ladder. The light was from a coal burning grate. When the new Longstone light was built in 1826 the Brownsman tower was demolished but the adjacent keeper's cottage was allowed to stand. The stump of the tower and other remains can still be seen.


Inner Farne, Farne Islands.
A short white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House. This lighthouse is situated on Inner Farne Island, one of the Farne Islands and at 2 ½ miles is the nearest to the shore. Built in 1766 the tower is 43 feet high and the light is visible for 15 miles. A small octagonal tower lighthouse built in 1810 was 27 feet high and visible for 12 miles. It was decommissioned in 1910.


Seahouses, Northumberland.
A square white painted brick tower lighthouse with a slightly curved domed roof and a window for a light situated at the end of the north west pier in the harbour. Seahouses is also known as North Sunderland harbour. Built in 1900 the tower is 30 feet high and the light is visible for 12 miles.


Warkworth, Northumberland.
A tall white metal pyramid navigational light structure on metal legs currently operated by the local Port Authority and showing a green light situated at the end of the north breakwater. Built in 1848 the tower is 33 feet high and the light is visible for 5 miles.


Amble, Northumberland.
A tall red and white concrete column navigation light currently operated by the local Port Authority and showing a red light situated at the end of the south pier in the local harbour. The tower is 33 feet high and the light is visible for 5 miles.


Coquet Island, Northumberland.
A tall partially white painted sandstone castellated tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House, situated on the island of Coquet 1 mile from the shore. Built in 1841 by Trinity House the tower is 72 feet high and the light is visible for 23 miles.


Blyth, Northumberland.
Pier - A squat white painted circular brick tower lighthouse with traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority situated at the end of the East Pier alongside a number of electricity wind turbines. Built in 1884 the tower is 54 feet high and the light is visible for 21 miles.
High Light - A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a window for a light situated in Bath Terrace, a short distance from the local Port. Built in 1788 the tower is 58 feet high and the light was visible for 10 miles. The light is now redundant.
Snook - I have seen a photograph of this old crumbling wooden white painted shed near some wind turbines and it is definitely a maritime aid but I have yet to do some research on it.


St. Mary’s, Northumberland.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light with buildings attached situated on St.Mary’s Island, Whitley Bay and connected to the mainland by a causeway. Built in 1888 the tower is 150 feet high and the light was visible for 22 miles. The light was made redundant in 1984.


Tynemouth, Northumberland.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the North pier at the mouth of the River Tyne. Built in 1864 the tower is 55 feet high and the light is visible for 26 miles.
The 79 feet high white painted stone tower lighthouse stood in the grounds of the Castle and Priory ruins. Rebuilt in 1681 and in due course converted to an oil lamp contained in a lantern roon, it was demolished in 1898.


North Shields, Northumberland.
High Light - A tall white painted stone square tower leading light and building attached currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated just above Fish Quay. Built in 1807 the tower is 58 feet high and the light is visible for 16 miles.
Low Light - A tall white painted stone square tower leading light and building attached currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on Fish Quay. Built in 1808 the tower is 85 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles. Old Light - A tall white painted brick square tower lighthouse with a circular light on top, with a dwelling attached, situated at Beacon Street, just above Fish Quay. Built in 1733 the light was made redundant in 1807.


South Shields, Northumberland.
Herd Groyne - A tall red painted corrugated iron lighthouse on iron legs with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on Herd Groyne. Built in 1882 the tower is 48 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles.
South Pier - A squat stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the South pier at the mouth of the River Tyne. Built in 1895 the tower is 39 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles.


Souter, County Durham.
A tall red and white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached situated at Lizard Point, Marsden and now maintained by the National Trust. Built in 1870 by Trinity House the tower is 76 feet high and the light was visible for 26 miles. The light was made redundant in 1989.


Sunderland, County Durham.
South Pier - A tall white painted circular cast iron tower lighthouse with a traditional light on top. It once stood on the end of the South pier but as a redundant light it was moved to its current location in Roker Cliff Park in 1982. Built in 1856 the tower is 50 feet high and the light was visible for 10 miles.
North Pier - A tall stone circular tower lighthouse built with natural white and natural red stone to give a horizontal striped effect with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the North pier, commonly known as Roker pier. Built in 1903 the tower is 77 feet high and the light is visible for 15 miles.


Seaham, County Durham.
A tall black and white painted cast iron circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the north pier outer harbour wall. Built in 1905 the tower is 40 feet high and the light is visible for 11 miles.
The earlier stone lighthouse built by William Chapman in 1831 was 58 feet tall and stood on Red Acre Point. It was made redundant in 1905 and demolished in 1940.


Hartlepool, County Durham.
Old Pier – A tall white painted close boarded wooden square tapering tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the Old pier. Built in 1836 the tower is 43 feet high and the light is visible for 7 miles.
The Heugh - A tall white painted metal circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the headland at the Heugh. Built in 1926 the tower is 54 feet high and the light is visible for 19 miles. A tall sandstone tower lighthouse with a traditional light once stood on this site. Built 1847 the tower was 73 feet high and the light was visible for 15 miles. Although it escaped damage when shelled by German gunboats in 1915, it was immediately pulled down.
Seaton - The old Seaton 1838 High light, which was 70 feet high, has been re-erected in the centre of the Marina as an interesting stone column structure without a light on the top.


Seaton Carew, County Durhan.
Two lighthouses were built here in 1838 and both 70 feet tall. The High light, which was a stone circular column, stood half a mile in land and the Low light, which was a 3 story octagonal building, on the shore. With changing coastal channels they soon fell into disuse and were demolished. No trace exists today although the High light found its way into a builder's scrap yard and was eventually rescued and rebuilt at the Marina, Hartlepool.


South Gare, Yorkshire.
A tall white painted cast iron circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority situated at the end of the breakwater behind the British Steel works. Built in 1884 the tower is 52 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.


Whitby, Yorkshire.
West pier – A tall yellow painted fluted stone tower lighthouse with galleried light situated at the end of the West pier and a further red ‘dustbin’ style harbour light on legs at the end of the extension to the pier. The local Port Authority currently operates the red navigation light. Built in 1831 the tower is 60 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.
East pier – A tall yellow painted fluted stone tower lighthouse with galleried light situated at the end of the East pier and a further green ‘dustbin’ style harbour light on legs at the end of the extension to the pier. The local Port Authority currently operates the green navigation light. Built in 1851 the tower is 43 feet high and the light is visible for 8 miles.
High Light – A small squat white brick octagonal tower lighthouse with a tradional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House situated on Ling Hill just outside Whitby. Built in 1858 to a design by James Walker, the tower is 44 feet high and the light is visible for 22 miles. There was a south light 66 feet high.


Scarborough, Yorkshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached situated on St.Vincent’s pier in the old harbour. Built in 1806 the tower is 66 feet high and suffered damage by bombardment from German gunboats during World War 1. The light is visible for 4 miles.


Flamborough, Yorkshire.
Chalk Tower – A tall disused white octagonal chalk tower built by Sir John Clayton in 1669 as a lighthouse but used as a beacon, situated on the chalk headland of Flamborough Head. The tower is 79 feet high.
Flamborough Head – A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with traditional light and cottages attached currently operated by Trinity House situated on the chalk headland of Flamborough Head. Built in 1806 by John Matson, a local Bridlington builder, who used no scaffolding and completed his work in 9 months. The tower is 87 feet high and the light is 214 feet above sea level and visible for 21 miles.


Bridlington, Yorkshire.
A tall working white cast iron harbour light at the end of the pier and another disused white cast iron light on the north harbour edge all in the harbour of Bridlington. Built in 1852 the post is 20 feet high and the light is visible for 5 miles.


Withernsea, Yorkshire.
A tall white painted brick tapering octagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached situated in the village of Withernsea. It is restored and maintained by a local volunteer society. Built in 1894 by Trinity House, the tower is 127 feet high and the light is 120 feet above sea level and was visible for 17 miles. The light was made redundant in 1972.


Spurn Point, Yorkshire.
Low Light – A tall brick circular tower lighthouse with the light removed in 1895 and a 20,000 gallon water tank placed on top situated at the end of the sandy spit at Spurn Point, now a nature reserve, at the mouth of the River Humber. Built in 1852 by John Smeaton the tower is 90 feet high. The light is now redundant.
High Light – A tall black and white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light situated at the end of the sandy spit at Spurn Point, now a nature reserve, at the mouth of the River Humber. Built in 1895 the tower is 128 feet high and the light is 120 feet above sea level and was visible for 17 miles. The light was made redundant in 1985.
Smeaton’s High Light – The base of the 1776 – 1895 can still be seen next to the current light. This tower was 112 feet high and the light was visible for 12 miles.


Thorngumbald, Yorkshire.
Low Light – A tall iron lighthouse on legs painted white currently in use by the local Port Authority and situated on the banks of the River Humber at Paull Roads. The adjacent keeper’s cottages have been demolished and the banks breached to allow the river to flood the land. Built in 1870 the tower is 30 feet high and the light is visible for 8 miles.
High Light – A tall iron lighthouse on legs painted red currently in use by the local Port Authority and situated on the banks of the River Humber at Paull Roads. The adjacent keeper’s cottages have been demolished. Built in 1870 the tower is 50 feet high and the light is visible for 9 miles.


Paull, Yorkshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with house attached which is now a private dwelling and in a good state of repair and situated on the banks of the River Humber in the village of Paull protected by the sea defence wall. Built in 1836 by Trinity House. The light is now redundant.


Salt End, Yorkshire.
The red cylindrical iron tower High Light and a similar but white painted Low Light were erected on the banks of the River Humber near Hull in 1870 and fell into disuse in the 1960s when new jetties were built for the oil terminal. No trace of them exists today.


Whitgift, Yorkshire.
A tall white painted brick round tower tapering at the top to support a white painted metal domed lantern room and external gallery. It is situated on the banks of the River Ouse at Whitgift.


Apex, Lincolnshire.
The splendid lighthouse that was erected in 1933 at the junction of the Rivers Ouse and Trent at Trent Falls is no longer there. I assume with the silting up of the channels and less traffic has meant that the light was no longer required.


Killingholme, Lincolnshire.
North Low – A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with house attached. Now a private dwelling and is in much need of tender loving care and situated on the banks of the River Humber at Killingholme Marshes protected by the sea defence wall. On a second visit it appeared that renovation works had commenced. Built in 1852 the tower is 45 feet high and the light was visible for 11 miles. The light was made redundant in 1920.
South Low – A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the banks of the River Humber at Killingholme Marshes protected by the sea defence wall. Built in 1836 the tower is 45 feet high and the light is visible for 11 miles.
High Light – A tall red brick circular tower lighthouse currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the banks of the River Humber at Killingholme Marshes protected by the sea defence wall. Built in 1876 the tower is 78 feet high and the light is visible for 14 miles.


Guys Head, Lincolnshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tapering tower lighthouse with a window light and dwelling attached situated on the West bank at the mouth of the River Nene in the fens of Lincolnshire at the Wash. Originally this was a headland on the coast before Nene Cut was built and the land to seaward was reclaimed from the shore. Built in 1826 the tower is 60 feet high. This redundant light has been lovingly restored and the original keeper’s cottage heavily extended.


East Nene, Lincolnshire.
A tall cream painted brick circular tapering tower lighthouse with a window light and dwelling attached situated on the East bank at the mouth of the River Nene in the fens of Lincolnshire at the Wash. Originally this was a headland on the coast before Nene Cut was built and the land to seaward was reclaimed from the shore. Built in 1826 the tower is 60 feet high. This redundant light has been lovingly restored and in the absence of any original keeper’s cottage new buildings have been sympathetically added. For a number of years it was the home of Sir Peter Scott, the naturalist, and his wild fowl sanctuary and the lighthouse is now administered by a trust.


Hunstanton, Norfolk.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached situated on Hunstanton Cliff. Built in 1844 the tower is 61 feet high. The light was made redundant in 1921 and sold the following year when the lantern was removed. It is now a private house and the lantern has been replaced with an additional storey.


Cromer, Norfolk.
A tall white painted brick octagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the headland adjacent to the golf links outside Cromer ½ mile from the cliff edge. Built in 1833 the tower is 58 feet high and the light is visible for 24 miles.


Happisburgh, Norfolk.
A tall red and white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and two keepers cottages attached situated at the edge of the village on the cliff edge. Since 1990 the light is currently operated by a registered charity under an Act of Parliament. Built in 1791 as one of a pair of lighthouses this high light is 85 feet high and the light is visible for 17 miles. The low light, closer to the cliff edge, was 65 feet high and was decommissioned and demolished in 1883.


Winterton, Norfolk.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a galleried window light and keepers cottages attached situated at the edge of the village close to the sand dunes. This redundant light is now a private home and is in need of a fresh coat of paint. Built in 1840 the tower is 62 feet high and the light was visible for 17 miles. The light was made redundant in 1921 when the original light was been removed. Access was through the holiday chalet complex.


Gorleston, Norfolk.
A tall red brick circular tower lighthouse with a galleried window light situated amongst shops on the promenade at Brush Bend opposite to the entrance to the pier. Built in 1887 the tower is 70 feet high and the light was visible for 6 miles. The light is now redundant.
The tall hexagonal white iron and painted close boarded wooden tower lighthouse with a canopied top and gallery and a traditional light that used to be on South pier has been demolished and replaced with a modern navigation light. Built in 1887 the tower was 20 feet high but was dismantled in 1955 when the pier was demolished and a new pier and a modern light built.


Lowestoft, Suffolk.
High Light – A squat white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House situated on the hill on the North of Lowestoft. Built in 1874 the tower is 53 feet high and the light is visible for 17 miles.
Low Light – A tall white painted corrugated iron tower lighthouse on metal legs, with a traditional light, situated on the promenade immediately below the High Light. Built in 1867 the tower was 45 feet high and was a movable structure. The light was made redundant in 1923 and demolished.
North and South Pier – Two white painted brick hexagonal tower lighthouses with a covered apron and seating at the base. Each has a traditional light and gallery and are situated at the end of the North and South piers and currently operated by the local Port Authority. Built in 1847 the towers are 39 feet high and the lights are visible for 6 miles.


Pakefield, Suffolk.
A small white painted brick and stone circular tower lighthouse with all round observation windows and gallery currently operated by the National Coastwatch and situated in the grounds of Pontins Holiday Centre at Pakefield on the cliff edge. Built in 1832 the tower is 30 feet high and the light was visible for 9 miles. It was made redundant in 1864.


Southwold, Suffolk.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated in the centre of the village. Built in 1889 the tower is 101 feet high and the light is visible for 17 miles.


Orford Ness, Suffolk.
A tall red and white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House situated on a spit of land only accessible by boat. The National Trust maintains the light. Built in 1793 as one of a pair of high and low lights the tower is 99 feet high and the light is visible for 16 miles. The low light was ‘lost’ in 1887 and on exceptional low spring tides the remains of the brick foundations can be seen as they become uncovered by the tide.


Felixstowe, Suffolk
Situated on the east end of Languard Point at 390 yards from the extremity was a white painted wooden framed lighthouse on legs, 38 feet high with a light visible for 5 miles. It was erected in 1861 to guide the way into Harwich Port, repainted in 1910 and destroyed by fire on 6th April 1925. No trace of it exists today. An earlier light was shown from Landguard Fort from 1848 and extinguished when the lighthouse became operational in 1861.


Harwich, Essex.
Constable Low Light - Constable painted at least three versions of this composition, one of which was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1820. The lighthouse, known as the Low Lighthouse, was one of two at Harwich. Both were leased at the time by Constable's friend and patron, Major-General Slater-Rebow of Wivenhoe Park.
High Light – A tall red brick 9 sided tower lighthouse with a window light situated in West Street in the centre of the town and now used as a wireless museum. Built in 1818 the tower is 70 feet tall. The light was made redundant in 1863.
Low Light – A squat white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a galleried window light and covered apron below, currently a Maritime Museum situated on the promenade. Built in 1818 the tower is 30 feet high. The light was made redundant in 1863.


Dovercourt, Essex.
High Light – A tall white painted close boarded wooden tower lighthouse on four iron legs with a window light situated on the promenade edge at Dovercourt. Built in 1863 the tower is 45 feet high and the light was visible for 11 miles. It was made redundant in 1917.
Low Light – A squat white painted close boarded wooden tower lighthouse on four iron legs with a window light situated on the beach alongside the promenade at Dovercourt. Built in 1863 the tower is 27 feet high and the light was visible for 9 miles. It was made redundant in 1917.


Gunfleet, Essex.
Gunfleet Lighthouse is situated 6 miles off the coast of Frinton on Sea on Gunfleet Sands. It was built 1850 as a screwpile lighthouse and decommissioned in 1920. It is still there today.


Maplin, Essex.
Maplin lighthouse was a screwpile lighthouse erected in 1838 on Maplin Sands. Tidal currents on the Thames caused it to become undermined and it was swept away in 1932.


Chapman, Essex.
Built in 1851 on the Chapman mud flats of the River Thames estuary near Canvey Island, Essex to warn passing boats of the off shore mud flats. The lighthouse was of a screw type with red painted wrought iron legs supporting a hexagonal shaped living accommodation consisting of a living room, bedroom, kitchen/washroom and storeroom. The tower was 74 feet high and the light visible for 11 miles. Eventually the lighthouse was in danger of collapsing and was decommissioned in 1953 and finally demolished in 1957. Today a single bell buoy can be found 800 yards off shore


Mucking, Essex.
Mucking Flat lighthouse was on the eastern part of Mucking Flats at Sea Reach on the Banks of the River Thames estuary. A temporary light was first exhibited from this position in October 1849 with the last structure built in 1851 on piles. It was painted black and white in alternate horizontal bands and connected with the shore by a long footbridge, also built on piles and coloured white. The height of the tower from base to vane was 66 feet and its central lamp burnt at 40 feet above high water and was visible for 11 miles. A fog bell was sounded during foggy weather. In 1881 it was raised to 70 feet and painted red. Between the Wars it was replaced with No.1 Mucking Buoy, and due to the effects of the 1953 floods on the riverbed and the result of a collision by the barge ‘Anglia’, the lighthouse was removed in December 1954. It is now replaced with a marker buoy.


Purfleet, Essex.
An experimental lighthouse built in 1828 on the 111 feet high Beacon Hill, Purfleet overlooking the Thames. The lighthouse and dwellings were very similar to the other traditional Trinity House designs such as Pakefield and Winterton. It was abandoned about 1870 as no longer required for lamp and reflector purposes. Some remains survived until 1925 but continued nearby quarrying and earth excavations removed the bluff on which it stood and no trace exists today. Old maps show of its existence.


Thames River Lights.
There are 9 lights on the River Thames; namely Shornmead, Northfleet Lower, Northfleet Upper, Broadness, Stoneness, Crayfordness, Coldharbour Point, Crossness and Margaretness. By the time I made my tour of them the lights at Jenningtree Point and Northfleet Upper had been removed. Only Shornmead, Northfleet Lower and Stoneness are worthy of any comment. As I update these records Shornemead has now been demolished.


Blackwall, London.
A tall brick hexagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light and workshops (former buoy store) attached situated on Trinity Buoy Wharf, River Thames opposite the London Millennium Dome. Built in 1863 by Trinity House this light was used for training purposes and was part of the training school and workshop facilities operated on this wharf. The site became redundant in 1988.


Whitstable, Kent.
I have a postcard dated 1953 which shows a photo of Whitstable lighthouse but when we visited in March 1999 I could find no trace of it and nor can I find any information about it. The 1948 Pilot describes ‘a light is exhibited at an elevation of 55 feet from a square white chimney 50 feet in height situated at the harbour’ and repeated in 1975


Margate, Kent.
A tall stone hexagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the pier in the local harbour. Built in 1954 by Dorman Long & Co, the tower is 59 feet high and the light is visible for 3 miles. The previous lighthouse, built in 1828, was a 100 feet high Doric column with a cast iron lantern on top and a spiral staircase inside. It was destroyed by a storm in 1953.


North Foreland, Kent.
A tall white painted brick octagonal tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light and currently operated by Trinity House situated high on a hill at North Foreland. Built in 1790 the tower is 85 feet high and the light is visible for 20 miles.


Ramsgate, Kent.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the west pier. Built in 1842 the tower is 38 feet high and the light is visible for 7 miles.


South Foreland, Kent.
A tall white painted stone octagonal castellated tower lighthouse with buildings attached and a traditional light situated high on the cliff at South Foreland near St.Margaret’s Bay. Built in 1793 as the high light the tower is 69 feet high and the light was visible for 26 miles. The light was made redundant in 1988 and sold to the National Trust.
The low light, which was built in 1793, had an octagonal tower 49 feet high and was made redundant in 1904. It now resides in a private garden and access is not allowed.


Dover, Kent
Prince of Wales Pier – A tall white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the pier. Built in 1902 the tower is 45 feet high and the light is visible for 4 miles.
Admiralty Pier – A tall white painted metal circular tower lighthouse on metal legs with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the pier. Built in 1908 the tower is 71 feet high and the light is visible for 20 miles. The previous light was demolished when the pier was extended.
Southern Breakwater - A tall white painted cast iron circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the knuckle. Built in 1909 the tower is 71 feet high.
Eastern Breakwater - A tall white painted cast iron circular tower lighthouse on a stone base with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated towards the end of the knuckle. Built in 1909 the tower is 71 feet high.


Folkestone, Kent.
Old Light - A tall white painted granite square tower lighthouse with a square observation window light and was situated at the end of the pier in the old harbour. Built in 1848 the tower was 31 feet high and the light was visible for 6 miles. No longer there.
New Light – A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority situated at the end on the new pier. Built in 1860 the tower is 28 feet high and the light is visible for 12 miles.


Dungeness, Kent.
No.5 Light – A tall black and white painted pre-cast concrete circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the shingle bank close to the Nuclear Power Station. Built in 1961 the tower is 140 feet high and the light is visible for 27 miles.
No.4 Light – A tall black painted brick circular tower lighthouse with traditional light situated close to the current lighthouse. Built in 1904 the tower is 143 feet high and the light was visible for 18 miles. The light was decommissioned in 1961.
No.3 Light – A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light with only the buildings formed around the base to show where this lighthouse rose from the middle of them. Built in 1792 the tower was 107 feet high and the light was visible for 16 miles. The light was decommissioned in 1904 and the tower demolished.


Hastings, Sussex.
A white painted close boarded square wooden tower with a hooded light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated high on West Hill overlooking the old harbour. The light is 160 feet above high water and visible for 4 miles.


Royal Sovereign, Sussex.
A small steel tower lighthouse on a reinforced concrete tower platform currently operated by Trinity House situated a couple of miles off the coast at Eastbourne. Built in 1971 the tower is 159 feet high and the light is visible for 28 miles.


Beachy Head, Sussex.
A red and white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the beach 3 miles west of Eastbourne. Built in 1902 the tower is 142 feet high and the light is visible for 25 miles.


Belle Tout, Sussex.
A granite circular tower lighthouse with window observation light and gallery and buildings attached situated 3 miles west of Eastbourne high on the cliff edge. In 1999 when the lighthouse was 15 feet from the edge it was moved 50 feet inland to prevent falling into the sea with cliff erosion. Built in 1828 at a distance of 100 feet from the edge of the cliff the tower was 47 feet high and the light was visible for 20 miles. The light was made redundant in 1902.


Newhaven, Sussex.
Breakwater – A tall white painted concrete circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the breakwater. Built in 1891 the tower is 55 feet high and the light is visible for 12 miles.
East Pier – A white painted close boarded wooden tower lighthouse mounted on legs with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the East pier. The tower is 41 feet high and the light is visible for 6 miles.
West Pier- The traditional stone tower lighthouse that once stood here has been demolished.
Leading Light - A square blue and white wooden hut with a protruding window showing a red light and currently operated by the local Port Authority. The hut is mounted on metal wheels standing on a small strip of railway line remaining from the days when the light could be moved along the lines.


Shoreham, Sussex.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the beach edge at Kingston by Sea, Shoreham. Built in 1846 the tower is 42 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.


Littlehampton, Sussex.
A white painted concrete plinth tower lighthouse with a letterbox light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the east pier. Built in 1948 the tower is 30 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.
High Light – A tall white painted close boarded wooden tower lighthouse with a green cupola roof situated at the shore end of the east pier. Built in 1848 the tower was 40 feet high and the light was visible for 10 miles. It was demolished in 1940 to prevent enemy ships using it as a landmark.
Low Light – A tall white painted close boarded wooden tower lighthouse with a green cupola roof situated at the end of the east pier. Built in 1868 the tower was 26 feet high and the light was visible for 7 miles. It was demolished in 1940 to prevent enemy ships using it as a landmark.


Southsea Castle, Hampshire.
A tall black and white painted brick circular tower lighthouse currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated within the walls of Southsea Castle on the promenade edge. Built in 1823 the tower is 18 feet high and the light is visible for 5 miles.


Spit Sand Fort, Hampshire.
A small red circular lighthouse and buildings currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the old Napoleonic Tower known as Spit Sand Fort Built in 1866 the tower is 58 feet high above sea level and the light is visible for 7 miles.


Beaulieu, Hampshire.
A small white painted circular masonry tower with a traditional octagonal lantern room on top and situated at Lepe Beach on the banks of the River Beaulieu where it joins The Solent. Built in 2000 the tower is 25 feet high.


Hurst, Hampshire.
Hurst Point – A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the spit of land at Hurst Point. Built in 1868 the tower is 85 feet high and the light is visible for 14 miles.
Old Low – A grey metal tower lighthouse supported on legs with a traditional light and also a squat granite circular tower lighthouse with an observation window light and gallery situated on the walls within Hurst Castle. Both towers are 52 feet high and the light was visible for 12 miles. The granite lighthouse was the low light from 1865 until replaced by the metal tower in 1911 which was then painted red. It was repainted grey in 1977 when it was decommissioned.


Egypt Point, Isle of Wight.
A tall red column with a white lantern situated at Egypt Point near the west side of the entrance to Cowes Harbour. First lit in 1897 by Trinity House, it became redundant in 1989 and was handed over to the Local Authority in 1997 to be maintained as a landmark. The tower is 25 feet high and the light was visible for 10 miles.


St.Helens Fort, Isle of Wight.
A navigational light is placed on the Napoleonic coastal defence fort at some distance from the beach at St. Helens. The tower is 53 feet high and the light is visible for 8 miles. There is also an interesting remains of an old church tower with the seaward-facing wall painted white to act as a daymark.


St. Catherine's, Isle of Wight.
A tall white painted brick octagonal castellated tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on St.Catherine’s Point. Built in 1840 the tower is 84 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles. Close by on St. Catherine’s Hill are the remains on an earlier partially built lighthouse and the restored Oratory lighthouse.


Freshwater, Isle of Wight.
This lighthouse was built in 1786 and was situated on the summit of High Down, overlooking Scratchell's Bay. It was a small brick tower 22 feet high with a keeper's cottage attached. It was discontinued in 1859 when the Needles lighthouse was established and survived as a ruin until about 1913.


Needles, Isle of Wight.
A tall red and white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated at the base of the Needles chalk promontory at the western edge. There is no sign of the earlier cliff top Freshwater lighthouse. Built in 1859 the tower is 109 feet high and the light is visible for 15 miles.


Swanage, Dorset.
A small squat white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated 1 mile south west of Swanage at Anvil Point. Built in 1881 the tower is 39 feet high and the light is visible for 19 miles.


Portland, Dorset.
Portland Bill – A red and white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House situated on the shore edge. Built in 1906 the tower is 136 feet high and the light is visible for 25 miles.
Old Lower Light – A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with an observation window light and gallery and buildings attached situated a short distance from the shore edge. Built in 1867 the tower is 85 feet high and the light was visible for 21 miles. The light was decommissioned in 1906.
Old Higher Light – A squat white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with an observation window light and gallery and buildings attached situated on high ground a short distance from the shore edge. Built in 1789 the tower is 50 feet high and the light was visible for 21 miles. The light was decommissioned in 1906.
Breakwater – A tall white painted cast iron circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the breakwater in Portland Bay. The stone lighthouse built in 1851 was demolished when the breakwater was extended. The cuurent tower is 70 feet high and the light is visible for 14 miles.


Teignmouth, East Devon.
A tall local grey limestone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the south end of Den promenade. Built in 1845 the tower is 37 feet high and the light is visible for 6 miles.


Brixham, East Devon.
Breakwater – A tall white painted cast iron circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority situated at the end on the Victoria breakwater in Brixham harbour. Built in 1839 the tower is 29 feet high and the light is visible for 3 miles.
Berry Head – A very small squat white painted circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House situated high on the cliff edge at Berry Head, just outside Brixham. Built in 1906 the tower is 15 feet high and the light is visible for 20 miles. This light is the smallest, highest and deepest light in the British Isles.


Dartmouth, East Devon.
West Side - The Dartmouth stone lighthouse was rebuilt in 1857 adjacent to the Castle and showed a red fixed light at 80 feet visible 10 miles from a white painted square tower. It was decommissioned in 1864 and no longer shows a light.
East Side - There was a white painted hexagonal stone lighthouse 36 feet high. Known as Kingswear lighthouse, a fixed white light was shown here from 1864. It was demolished in 1980 when the foundations were found to be unsafe. The base can still be seen today.
It was replaced by a small squat white painted circular GRP tower lighthouse with a hooded light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the base of the old light. The modern tower is 30 feet high and visible for 11 miles.
There is an octagonal day beacon of grey granite 80 feet high on land 500 feet above sea level above the eastern side of the harbour.


Start Point, East Devon.
A tall white painted granite circular castellated tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House and situated at the end of a very long and narrow road on an isolated Start Point. Built in 1836 the tower is 92 feet high and the light is visible for 21 miles.


Plymouth, East Devon.
Smeaton’s Tower – A tall red and white painted stone tower lighthouse with a traditional light situated on Plymouth Hoe. Built in 1759 by John Smeaton it stood on Eddystone Rocks until 1882 when all but the base stump was moved to its current position.
Breakwater – A tall grey granite circular lower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the breakwater in Plymouth Sound. Built in 1844 the tower is 76 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles.


Eddystone, East Devon.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and helicopter landing platform on top currently operated by Trinity House and situated 14 miles south south west of Plymouth on Eddystone Rocks, adjacent to the stump base of Smeaton’s tower. Built in 1882 the tower is 168 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles.


Looe, East Cornwall.
An ordinary navigation light supported on a red painted iron column, with metal steps attached and a small metal balcony, situated on the end of Banjo Pier and operated by the local Harbour Authority. The column was erected in the 1860s and is 20 feet high with a white occulting light visible 15 miles.


Polperro, East Cornwall.
A white painted brick structure with an ordinary navigation light on top, situated on Spy House Point and operated by the local Harbour Authority. There is an access door in the base which is no longer used now that the light is automated. Built in 1911, the tower is 10 feet high and the light is visible for 8 miles. On Western Pier head there is a light on a stone structure visible 4 miles.


Fowey, East Cornwall.
Whitehouse Pier – A red painted circular metal drum lighthouse supported on a single metal column with a letter box light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the edge at Whitehouse Pier. The tower is 20 feet high and the light is visible for 8 miles. It was secondhand when it was placed here in 1904.
St.Catherine’s Point – A squat red painted cast iron circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light, resting on an octagonal tower concrete plinth, currently operated by the local Port Authority, and situated on the cliff edge at St.Catherines Point at the mouth of the River Fowey. The tower is 20 feet high and the light is visible for 15 miles.


Gribben Head, East Cornwall.
This daymark is worthy of mention here. It is a square stone tower painted in red and white bands with a castellated top. Built in 1832 the tower is 84 feet high. There is a door in the base and steps up to the top. The tower is owned by the National Trust and is open to the public on occasions.


Mevagissey, East Cornwall.
A tall white painted with black base cast iron octagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the south outer harbour wall. The tower is 29 feet high and the light is visible for 12 miles.


Falmouth, East Cornwall.
A tall white painted brick octagonal tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House but maintained by the National Trust and situated at St.Athony’s Head on the eastern approach to Falmouth harbour. Built in 1835 the tower is 62 feet high and the light is visible for 22 miles.


Lizard, East Cornwall.
A tall white painted hexagonal tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated at the Lizard Point. In addition there is a similar second western tower from which the light was removed in 1903. Built in 1751 the towers are 61 feet high and the light is visible for 25 miles.


Mullion, East Cornwall.
The remains of a cast iron lamp post acting as a navigation light can be seen on the corner of this disused harbour. Disused and given to the National Trust in 1948 the harbour light base may well date back to the 1840s.


Marazion, East Cornwall.
A squat white painted brick hexagonal castellated tower lighthouse with a window light situated on the edge of the harbour wall at Marazion in Mounts Bay. The light is now disused.


Penzance, East Cornwall.
A white painted with black base cast iron circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the south pier in the harbour. Built in 1853 at the Copperhouse Foundry at Hayle the tower is 31 feet high and the light is visible for 9 miles.


Newlyn, East Cornwall.
A white painted with red base and top cast iron circular lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the south harbour wall. Built in 1885 the tower is 34 feet high and the light is visible for 9 miles. There is a red painted cast iron column lamp with a replacement light on the old quay.


Tater Du, East Cornwall.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and building attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the cliff edge a short distance from Lamorna Cove. Built in 1965 the tower is 50 feet high and the light is visible for 23 miles.


Gwennap Head, East Cornwall.
These two daymark beacons are worthy of mention here. Built in 1821 and 12 feet high they are 220 feet apart and line up with Runnelstone buoy marking Runnelstone Rock. The high or north beacon is a black and white painted stone circular tower with a conical top and a square base. The low or south beacon is a red painted stone circular pyramid or cone.


Longships, East Cornwall.
A tall granite circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and helicopter landing platform on top currently operated by Trinity House and situated on Longships Rocks 1 mile west from Lands End. Built in 1873 this second lighthouse tower is 168 feet high and the light is visible for 16 miles.


Wolf Rock, East Cornwall.
A tall granite circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and a helicopter landing platform on top currently operated by Trinity House and situated on Wolf Rock 9 miles south west of Lands End. Built in 1870 the tower is 135 feet high and the light is visible for 23 miles.


Round Island, Scilly Islands.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on Round Island the most northerly outpost of the Scillies. Built in 1887 the tower is 63 feet high and the light is visible for 24 miles.


Peninnis, Scilly Islands.
A tall white painted metal structure lighthouse on legs currently operated by Trinity House and situated on Peninnis Head on St. Marys Island. Built in 1911 the tower is 45 feet high and the light is visible for 17 miles.


St. Agnes, Scilly Islands.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with buildings attached and a traditional light situated on high ground in the centre of the island of St.Agnes. Built in 1680 the tower is 74 feet high and was visible for 18 miles. The light was made redundant in 1911.


St. Martin’s, Scilly Islands.
A red and white painted stone conical tower situated on the eastern side of St. Martin’s Island at St. Martin’s Head. The tower is hollow and has a stone staircase inside to the upper floors where there are windows. The access door has been removed and sealed with concrete blocks. The tower is a daymark and not a lighthouse. Built in 1683 by Thomas Elkins, the tower is 40 feet high.


Bishop Rock, Scilly Islands.
A tall granite circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and a helicopter-landing platform on top currently operated by Trinity House situated on Bishop Rock west of Scilly Isles. Built in 1887 this is the third lighthouse to occupy this site. The tower is 167 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles.


Pendeen, West Cornwall.
A small squat white painted rubble stone cement rendered circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House and situated at Pendeen near St.Just. Built in 1900 the tower is 56 feet high and the light is visible for 28 miles.


St. Ives, West Cornwall.
Pier Light – A tall white with black base painted cast iron octagonal lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority situated on the edge at the end of the west harbour wall. Built in 1890 the tower is 32 feet high and the light is visible for 6 miles.
Smeaton’s Light – A squat square stone square tower lighthouse with an observation window light and octagonal gallery set in the middle of Smeaton’s pier harbour wall. Built 1830 the tower is 20 feet high and the light was visible for 7 miles. It became redundant when the wall was extended in 1890.


Hayle, West Cornwall.
A tall square white painted with a red stripe precast concrete tower lighthouse with a window light, standing on four legs, currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the edge of the St.Ives branch railway line at Lelant golf links overlooking the disused Hayle harbour. The front low light is of a similar construction. The tower is 15 feet high and there is evidence that this is a replacement rear light for a similar type that stood on the same site. Lights have stood on these sites since 1840 and are visible for 6 miles.


Godrevy Island, West Cornwall.
A tall white painted stone octagonal white tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on Godrevy Island close to the shore near Hayle. Built in 1859 the tower is 86 feet high and the light is visible for 12 miles.


Carn Brea, West Cornwall.
A light shone from a mining stack on Carn Brea in 1815 which could be seen in the Bristol Channel. It was discontinued by the 1880s and partially demolished although the remainder of the building can be seen today.


Portreath, West Cornwall.
A squat white painted stone circular tower obsolete tower lighthouse with a flat stepped roof, capped with a pinnacle (formerly holding a navigation light) and situated at the end of the disused tram line at Landmark Pier. There is also a white painted daymark. It is a 25 feet high stone conical shaped tower on the hill bordering the harbour. It has a small door in the base. In addition there is a small pilchard look out hut on the harbour edge and a further brick castellated look out tower near the daymark.


Trevose Head, West Cornwall.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House and situated in splendid isolation at Trevose Head near Padstow. Built in 1847 the tower is 87 feet high and the light is visible for 25 miles. A low light with a range of 17 miles, which stood 50 feet in advance of the high light, was made redundant and demolished.


Padstow, West Cornwall.
A red painted cast iron column with a ladder attached situated on the south pier head. The column is 20 feet high and now topped with a modern uninteresting navigational red lamp. However it is worthy of mention here as it was erected in 1868.


Hartland Point, West Devon.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on Hartland Point belonging to the National Trust. Built in 1874 the tower is 59 feet high and the light is visible for 17 miles.


Clovelly, West Devon.
A simple basket type light was erected on the end of the stone sea wall by Neville Fane as a memorial to those who drowned there in 1852.


Braunton, West Devon.
Small tubular steel structure lighthouse with a navigational light on top currently operated by Trinity House and situated on Braunton sands at Crow Point. The tower is 25 feet high and the light is visible for 5 miles.
High Light – A tall white painted close boarded wooden octagonal tower lighthouse supported outside with wooden braces, with a red stripe and a traditional light, and buildings attached situated at the end of Braunton Sands near Crow Point. Built in 1820 and altered in 1889 by Joseph Nelson the tower was 86 feet high and the light was visible for 14 miles. The light was made redundant and demolished in 1957.
Low Light - A white painted closed boarded wooden hut with a red stripe and a window light supported on wooden legs and situated not far from the high light. Built in 1802 and altered in 1902 the tower was 15 feet high and was demolished in 1957 when it became redundant.


Instow, West Devon.
Front Light - An open lattice tower 58 feet tall with white daymark coverings and a light on the top.
Rear Light - An open lattice tower 28 feet tall with white daymark coverings and a light on the top.


Mortehoe, West Devon.
A modern square brick built tower lighthouse with a modern light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House situated at Bull Point where coastal erosion is a constant threat. Built in 1976 it replaced a traditional white circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light, built in 1879 with a tower 55 feet high and a light visible for 19 miles, which had to be demolished due to coastal erosion.


Lundy Island
Old– A tall granite circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light situated in the centre of Lundy Island 24 miles west of Ilfracombe. Built in 1819 the tower is 95 feet high. The light was made redundant in 1897.
North – A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the north of the island 24 miles west of Ilfracombe. Built in 1897 the tower is 56 feet high and the light is visible for 24 miles.
South - A squat white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the south east of the island 24 miles west of Ilfracombe. Built in 1897 the tower is 52 feet high and the light is visible for 19 miles.


Ilfracombe, West Devon.
A stone built chapel with slate roof and a circular window light on one end, currently operated by Trinity House and situated on Lantern Hill above Ilfracombe harbour. Built about 1325 the light tower was added about 1650. The current light tower was added in 1819. The tower is 37 feet high and a red light is shown 1st September to 30th March at a height of 127 feet and visible for 6 miles.


Lynmouth, West Devon.
A stone built square tower erected as a gift by General Rawden in the 1840s with unconventional light and galleries situated on the edge of the harbour wall. Known as Rhenish Tower as it was a deliberate copy of one of the Rhineland drachenfels it was moved and rebuilt in its present position after the Lynmouth/Lynton flood disaster of 1952. The tower is 35 feet high.


Foreland Point, West Devon.
A squat white painted brick tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on Foreland Point 2 miles north east of Lynmouth. Built in 1900 the tower is 16 feet high. The light is 220 feet above sea level and visible for 18 miles.


Watchet, Somerset.
A tall red painted cast iron hexagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the western harbour edge. Built in 1862 the tower is 22 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.


Burnham, Somerset.
Old Light - A tall white painted brick circular castellated tower lighthouse with a window light situated on the sand dunes in the church graveyard on the shore edge. Built in 1801 by the order of the local Curate this original lighthouse had the top 2 floors removed in 1832 when it was made redundant and replaced by the current light.
Low Light - A white painted close boarded square wooden tower lighthouse with a window light supported by 9 wooden pile legs, currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the beach. Built in 1832 the tower is 36 feet high and was decommissioned in 1969 but renovated and brought back into service in 1996.
High Light - A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a window light and cottages attached situated inland in the town centre. Built in 1832 this high light is 99 feet high. The light was visible for 17 miles and was made redundant in 1996.


Flatholm, Somerset.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on Flatholm Island at the junction of the Bristol Channel and the Severn estuary about 4 ½ miles from Weston Super Mare. Built in 1820 the tower is 99 feet high and the light is visible for 19 miles.


Monkstone, Glamorgan.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a navigational light on top currently operated by Trinity House and situated in the Bristol Channel near Lavernock Point. Built in 1839 the tower is 75 feet high and the light is visible for 12 miles.


Portishead, Somerset.
Blacknore – A tall white painted metal tower lighthouse on four metal legs with a traditional light formerly operated by Trinity House situated on rocks on the shore edge at Blacknore Point. Built in 1894 the tower is 36 feet high and the light is visible for 15 miles. Made redundant in 2011 and now maintained by a local trust.
Battery Point – A black painted metal structure lighthouse with a white concrete base with a navigational light on top currently operated by Trinity House and situated at the end of a little jetty on rocks close to the shore at Battery Point near Lake Grounds and the swimming pool. Built is 1930 the tower is 29 feet high.


Avonmouth, Gloucestershire.
North Pier - A tall Norwegian granite stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority situated at the end of the pier in the Royal King Edward Docks. Built in 1908 the tower is 53 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles.
South Pier - A tall Norwegian granite stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority situated at the end of the pier in the Royal King Edward Docks. Built in 1907 the tower is 30 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.
Avon– A tall stone built octagonal castellated tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light, situated roughly where the Avonmouth Docks are today. Built in 1839 by Trinity House the light was visible for 14 miles. The light was made redundant in 1902 and demolished to make way for the current Avonmouth Docks. A temporary wooden structure lighthouse stood from 1902 until 1908 when the Docks were completed.


River Severn Lights.
For the moment I have excluded these.


Black Rock, Monmouthshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a navigational light on top currently operated by the local Port Authority situated on rocks in the channel near the Severn Bridge. Built in 1868.


Gold Cliff, Monmouthshire.
A white painted cast iron oblong box tower lighthouse with a navigational light on top currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on a grassy bank high up on Gold Cliff. The tower is 29 feet high and the light is visible for 6 miles.


East Usk, Monmouthshire.
A tall white painted metal structure lighthouse with a hooded light supported on 6 screw pile legs sunk 15 ½ feet into the ground currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated near the village of Nash on the East side of the River Usk. Built in 1893 the tower is 44 feet high and the light is visible for 15 miles.


West Usk, Monmouthshire.
A small squat white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light built in the centre of the attached circular dwellings situated on the western edge of the River Usk. Built in 1821 on what was then an island the tower is 56 feet high and the light was visible for 11 miles. It was the first light to be built by James Walker (1781-1862). The light was made redundant in 1922.


Barry Docks, Glamorgan.
A tall white painted cast iron tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the western edge of the harbour wall to the docks. Built in 1890 the tower is 38 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.


Nash Point, Glamorgan.
High Light – A tall white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated high on the cliff edge at Nash Point. Built in 1832 the tower is 122 feet high and the light is visible for 21 miles.
Low Light – A tall white painted stone circular tower redundant lighthouse with the light removed but the gallery remaining. Built in 1832 the tower is 67 feet high.


Porthcawl, Glamorgan.
A tall white painted with a black base cast iron hexagonal tower lighthouse with a hooded window light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on a black stone plinth at the end of the breakwater. Built in 1860 the tower is 30 feet high and the light is visible for 6 miles.


Swansea, Glamorgan.
William Jernegan (1750-1836) was a local architect who designed a cast iron lighthouse which was erected on the end of Swansea pier in 1803. No trace of this survives today.


Mumbles, Glamorgan.
A tall white painted brick octagonal tower lighthouse with buildings attached and a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on the island connected to the mainland at Mumbles at the western end of Swansea Bay. Built in 1794 the tower is 56 feet high and the light is visible for 19 miles.


Burry Holms, Glamorgan.
There used to be an unmanned white circular iron lighthouse here, 12 feet high, resting on a concrete base. The light was white group flashing twice every 10 seconds. It was placed there in 1926 and removed in 1966. In June 1999 I understood from local people that there was no trace of it but a similar looking one can be found at St. Catherine's Point, Fowey.


Whitford Point, Glamorgan.
A tall derelict rusting circular cast iron tower lighthouse with the remains of a traditional light and iron balcony situated on the sands at Whitfort Point, Gower National Park. Built in 1865 the tower is 44 feet high and the light was visible for 7 miles. The light was made redundant in 1926. A previous wooden pile structure lighthouse built in 1854 was destroyed by stormy seas.


Burry Port, Carmarthenshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and large gallery currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the breakwater at the entrance to the harbour. Built in 1842 the light is visible for 9 miles.


Saundersfoot, Pembrokeshire.
A tall local stone rubble circular tower lighthouse with a flat domed roof which carries a red navigational light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the end of the south pier on the harbour wall. Built in 1848 the tower is 18 feet high and the light is visible for 7 miles.


Caldy Island, Pembrokeshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on the summit of Caldy Island off the coast of Tenby. Built in 1829 the tower is 52 feet high and the light is visible for 21 miles.


Great Castle Head, Pembrokeshire.
Two white painted low square stone tower beacons with a window light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at Great Castle Head 4 miles west of Milford Haven Front Light built in 1870 the tower is 17 feet high and the light is visible for 14 miles. Rear Light built in 1870 the tower was reduced from 42 feet high to 21 feet when a new navigational aid was built. The light is visible for 16 miles.


St. Anns Head, Pembrokeshire.
Low Light - A small squat white painted octagonal tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on the headland. Built in 1841 the tower is 42 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles.
High Light – A tall white painted brick tower lighthouse with buildings attached. This redundant lighthouse has had the light removed and replaced with a now redundant coast guard watch room. Built in 1714 the tower is 75 feet high and the light was visible for 20 miles. It was made redundant in 1910.


Skokholm Island, Pembrokeshire.
A tall white painted brick hexagonal tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on Stokholm Island 5 miles off the coast of St.Ann’s Head. Built in 1916 the tower is 58 feet high and the light is visible for 20 miles.


Smalls, Pembrokeshire.
A tall red and white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House situated on the Smalls, a group of rocks at the entrance to St.George'’ Channel 23 miles west of St.Ann’s Head. Built in 1861 the tower is 141 feet high and the light is visible for 26 miles.


South Bishop, Pembrokeshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the island 5 miles west of St.David’s Head. Built in 1839 the tower is 36 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles.


Strumble Head, Pembrokeshire.
A small squat white painted brick circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House on an islet known as Strumble Point and connected to the mainland by a foot bridge. Built in 1908 the tower is 55 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles.


Fishguard, Pembrokeshire.
A tall brick octagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the breakwater. Built 1905, the tower is 46 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles.


New Quay, Cardiganshire.
The tall round roughly built white painted tower lighthouse with an open window type light, showed a fixed light, and was situated at the end of the pier. Built in 1839, the tower was 30 feet high and had a small door in the base. Known as the 'Pepper Pot', the light was visible for 6 to 10 miles but was swept into the sea during a gale on 28th February 1937. It has now been replaced with a modern navigation light as a memorial to those of both World Wars.


Aberdovey, Caernarvonshire.
A 1946 report by Trinity House refers to a lighthouse that was in use before the 1914-18 war but extinguished by the 1943-45 war. I have yet to find it.


St.Tudwal’s Island Caernarvonshire.
A stone tower lighthouse currently operated by Trinity House and situated on St.Tudwal’s Island at the north end of Cardigan Bay ½ mile from the coast. Built in 1877 the tower is 35 feet high and the light is visible for 18 miles.


Bardsey Island, Caernarvonshire.
A tall red and white painted brick square tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the southern tip of the island which is 2 miles from the coast. Built in 1821 the tower is 99 feet high and the light is visible for 17 miles.


Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey.
Lighthouse - A tall white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with a conical slate roof and cottage attached with a window light situated on high ground on the edge of the island. Built in 1846 the tower is 35 feet high and was visible for 7 miles. The light was made redundant in 1975.
Beacon – A tall white painted conical tower made of rough stone with a navigation light on top currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the on the extreme seaward perimeter of the island. Built between 1800 and 1818.


South Stack, Anglesey.
A tall white painted brick tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on a 100 feet high rock island connected to the mainland by a narrow bridge and steep steps. Built in 1809 the tower is 91 feet high and the light is visible for 21 miles.


Holyhead, Anglesey.
Admiralty Pier - A tall stone tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of Admiralty Pier. Built in 1821 to a design by John Rennie, the tower is 48 feet high and the light is visible for 1 mile.
Breakwater – A tall black and white painted square stone tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end on the 1.87 mile long breakwater, the U.K’s longest breakwater. Built in 1873 the tower is 61 feet high and the light is visible for 14 miles.


Skerries, Anglesey.
A tall red and white painted stone circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated on the Skerries, a low tract of land 7 miles north east of Holyhead and 2 miles from the coast. Built in 1714 the tower is 75 feet high and the light is visible for 17 miles.


Amlwch, Anglesey.
Old Light - A squat stone and brick square tower lighthouse with slate roof and a window light attached to harbour buildings situated at the end of the old harbour. Built in 1853 the tower is 15 feet high and the light was visible for 6 miles. The light is now redundant.
New Light – An unimpressive tall white painted metal column with a navigation light on top currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the new harbour extension.
Churchyard – A tall stone model of a rock lighthouse gravestone in memory of a lighthouse keeper.


Point Lynas, Anglesey.
A tall white painted square stone castellated building lighthouse with a ground floor observation window light currently operated by Trinity House and situated high on the cliff edge at Point Lynas. Built in 1835 by the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board the tower is 37 feet high and the light is visible for 20 miles.


Trwyn Du, Anglesey.
A tall black and white stone circular tower lighthouse with castellations and a traditional light currently operated by Trinity House and situated a few yards close to the shore at Trywn Du. Built in 1838 the tower is 96 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles.


Great Orme, Caernarvonshire.
A stone square castellated tower building lighthouse with a ground floor observation window light situated high on the cliff edge at the Great Ormes Head at Llandudno. Built in 1862 by the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board the tower is 37 feet high and the light was visible for 24 miles. It was transferred to the control of Trinity House in 1973 and made redundant in 1985.


Talacre, Flintshire.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a raised metal approached and a red painted traditional light situated on the beach at Point of Air at the mouth of the River Dee. Built in 1776 the tower is 58 feet high. The light was made redundant in 1883.


Hilbre Island, Cheshire.
This island is in the mouth of the Dee estuary, off Hoylake. In 1927 a navigational light was placed on top of a 10 feet lattice tower, but in my 1948 photo of it, it was situated on top of a metal cupboard.


West Kirby, Cheshire.
There is a day mark here over looking the River Dee. It is a tall red sand stone column with a sphere on the top, built in 1841.


Hoylake, Cheshire.
High Light – A tall brick hexagonal tower lighthouse with buildings attached with a traditional light standing in Valencia Road in the residential part of the town. Built in 1866 the tower is 72 feet high and the light was visible for 9 ½ miles. The light was made redundant in 1886.
Low Light –A tall white painted brick hexagonal castellated tower lighthouse with a traditional light situated on the promenade by the life boat station at Hoylake. Built in 1865 the tower was 42 feet high and the light was visible for 11 miles. The light was made redundant in 1908 and later demolished.
Replica Light – A modern tall cement rendered brick circular tower lighthouse with a new house attached and with a replica double glazed observation window light and gallery situated in Stanley Road.


Bidston Hill, Cheshire.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light standing in the grounds of the Observatory. Built in 1873 by the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board. The tower is 68 feet high and the light was visible for 23 miles. The light was made redundant in 1913. The stone octagonal 55 feet high tower lighthouse built in 1771 close to the current lighthouse was demolished in 1872.


Leasowe, Cheshire.
A tall white painted brick tower lighthouse with a window balcony light situated on the landside of the shore. Built in 1763 by the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board the tower is 110 feet high and the light was visible for 15 miles. The light was made redundant in 1908.


New Brighton, Cheshire.
A tall white painted granite circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light situated on the sands near the Fort at New Brighton. Built in 1830 the tower is 94 feet high and the light was visible for 14 miles. The light was made redundant in 1973.


Birkenhead, Cheshire.
A small white painted stone round tower with a traditional red lantern on top. It is situated at Woodside Ferry pier at Birkenhead where the Liverpool – Birkenhead ferry crosses the Mersey, and is operated by the local port authority. Built in the 1984 it stands in the same position on the pier, as did its predecessor, which dated from the 1840s. However the red lantern was removed from the old light on the ferry landing stage when this was demolished at the same time in the 1980s. This old landing stage light stood on a wooden trestle and also carried a large bell.


Ellesmere, Cheshire.
A tall red brick hexagonal tower lighthouse and buildings attached with a traditional light situated at the entrance of the Shropshire Canal at Whitby Locks adjoining the Manchester Ship Canal at Ellesmere Port. Built in 1829 the tower is 36 feet high and the light was visible for 19 miles. The light was made redundant in 1891.


Ince, Cheshire.
A lighthouse was built here in 1838 and I assume that with the opening of the Manchester Ship Canal in 1894 it was discontinued and later demolished. A 1916 chart of the Upper Mersey confirms its existence and demolition.


Weston Point, Cheshire.
The red sandstone lighthouse built in 1843 was decommissioned in 1911 and demolished in 1960. It stood adjacent to the now derelict church on the confluence of the Weston Point docks on the River Weaver and the Manchester Ship Canal.


Hale Head, Lancashire.
A tall white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached situated near Dungeon Banks on the River Mersey. It is now a private dwelling house. Built in 1906 the tower is 50 feet high and the light was visible for 7 miles. The light was made redundant in 1958. The previous hexagonal tower lighthouse attached to a small cottage, built 1838, was demolished in 1906.


Bootle, Lancashire.
Known as North Wall, Liverpool, this interesting lighthouse was built in 1887 by Mersey Docks and Harbour Board and then demolished in 1927/8 to make way for the new Gladstone Dock. It has been replaced with a modern and uninteresting white painted square concrete tower 29 feet high.


Crosby, Lancashire.
Crosby lighthouse was situated almost on the shore, in the middle of sand dunes, about ¼ mile from the railway station at Hightown, north of Crosby. The first one was a wooden structure built in 1839 with a tower 96 feet high and showing a fixed red light. It was replaced in 1847 with one that consisted of a square brick tapering tower 74 feet high with an iron veranda near the top. This and the attached keeper’s cottage were painted white. It showed a light for a range of 12 miles. The lighthouse was destroyed by fire in 1898 and no trace of it exists today.


Formby, Lancashire.
Originally built as a daymark in 1721, it was converted to a lighthouse in 1834 showing a fixed yellow light over a range of 12 miles. It was demolished in 1941 and no trace of it exists today.


Lytham, Lancashire.
A stone lighthouse 72 feet high was built here in 1848 on dry land on the banks of the river Ribble. By 1863 erosion had left it standing in the sea and it collapsed when its foundations were undermined by the sea. A new stone tower was built in 1865 a little distance away at Stanner Point, again on dry land, but appears to be decommissioned by 1875 and disused in 1897. Presumably coastal erosion dealt this lighthouse the same fate as no trace of it exists today. There have also been a couple of other wooden replacements.


Fleetwood, Lancashire.
Low Light - A tall stone square tower base with additional round tower on top lighthouse with a window light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on the esplanade. Built in 1840 the tower is 44 feet high and the light is visible for 9 miles.
High Light - A tall red brick circular tower lighthouse with a window galleried light currently operated by the local Port Authority in a street a short distance from the esplanade. Built in 1840 the tower is 90 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles.


Wyre, Lancashire.
The tall red painted corrugated iron lighthouse with traditional light and with living accommodation, standing on cast iron legs at North Wharf Bank at the mouth of the River Wyre at 1 ½ miles from Fleetwood was destroyed in 1948. Only the iron legs remain firmly implanted in the sand and the structure bears a navigational light as a warning to ships. Built in 1840 on screw piles the tower was 40 feet high and the light was visible for 10 miles.


Cockersand, Lancashire.
Rear Light - The tall slate tower lighthouse on a white wooden support has been destroyed. The adjoining lighthouse keeper’s cottage remains situated on the edge of the River Lune near Cockersand Abbey. Built in 1847 the tower was 58 feet high and the light was visible for 7 miles.
Front Light - A tall white painted stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at Plover Scar on the River Lune near Cockersand Abbey. Built in 1847 the tower is 27 feet high and the light was visible for 7 miles.


Glasson Dock, Lancashire.
There is a redundant 20 feet high white painted square brick building which houses the light in the roof.


Heysham, Lancashire.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a navigational light on the top currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the edge of the Port. The base of a similar structure was close to it. There is also a 20 feet high white painted cast iron lighthouse with a red base within the dock complex and standing on the south pier.


Morecambe, Lancashire.
A tall stone circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light attached to the old railway building, currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of Stone Head pier. Built in 1853 as a railway terminus for the Scottish and Irish ferries, the tower is 50 feet high and the light is visible for 8 miles.


Rampside, Lancashire.
A tall slender red and yellow brick square tower rear leading light situated on the beach. This is one of a pair, and there are a total of 3 pairs of beacons situated at Rampside Sands, Walney Channel and Biggar Sands, but this is the only one worthy of note. It is leading light No. 4. Built between 1850 and 1870 the tower is 46 feet high and the light is visible for 6 miles.


Walney Island, Lancashire.
A tall white painted brick octagonal tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached situated on a sandy spit in the centre of a nature reserve. It is operated by the Port of Lancaster Commissioners. Built in 1790 the tower is 70 feet high and the light is visible for 23 miles.


Haverigg, Cumberland.
A tall stone circular tower redundant lighthouse with a window light, built 1866, situated at the Hodbarrow old iron ore mine workings. These redundant workings were flooded in 1968 to create the current a nature reserve, at Hodbarrow Point, Millom.


Hodbarrow Point, Cumberland.
A tall rusting circular cast iron tower redundant lighthouse with the remains of a traditional light and gallery situated on the sea defence wall ½ miles west of Hodbarrow Point, Millom. Also known as Millom Breakwater light. Built in the 1905 the tower is 30 feet high and the light was visible for 11 miles. It was restored and painted red and white in 2003.


St. Bee's Head, Cumberland.
A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with a traditional light and buildings attached currently operated by Trinity House and situated at North Head headland. Built in 1866 the tower is 55 feet high and the light is 336 feet above sea level and visible for 25 miles.


Whitehaven, Cumberland.
North Pier - A tall white painted brick round castellated tower lighthouse with a navigational light on top currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the North pier. Built in 1821 the tower is 20 feet high and the light is visible for 9 miles.
West Pier - A tall white painted brick circular tower lighthouse with traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated at the end of the West pier. The tower is 47 feet high and the light is visible for 13 miles.
Old Outer - A tall stone circular tower redundant lighthouse with a galleried light and buildings attached situated on the wall of the old outer harbour.
Old Inner - A tall stone circular tower redundant lighthouse with a window light and buildings attached situated on the wall of the old inner harbour.


Harrington, Cumberland.
A light was established at the end of the pier as early as 1848 consisting of a red drum type which was visible for 11 miles. It was altered in 1890 when a new pier was established. It remained in use until discontinued in 1929 and demolished in a storm in 1931. No trace exists today.


Maryport, Cumberland.
Old Light - A tall white disused cast iron navigational light on a stone polygonal tower situated at the end of the old harbour pier. Built in 1846 the light is 35 feet high and was visible for 12 miles.
New Light - An uninteresting white painted concrete plinth with a navigational light on top currently operated by Trinity House since 1961 and situated at the end of the pier extension to the harbour.


Silloth, Cumberland.
Eastcote Rear Light – Also called Skinburness. A tall white painted corrugated iron structure lighthouse on iron legs with a traditional light currently operated by the local Port Authority and situated on headland at Silloth Bay. Built in 1841 and altered in 1913 the tower is 39 feet high and the light is visible for 10 miles.
Front Light - An uninteresting 14 feet high wooden tower with a navigational light and other apparatus attached at the entrance to the dock and currently operated by the local Port Authority.Old postcards show that this is where there used to be an octagonal wooden gas lighthouse at the end of the pier. It was demolished when the pier was removed.
Lees Scar lighthouse - only the iron legs remain firmly implanted in the sand and situated about ½ mile south of Silloth. The 45 feet high pile light has long since been removed but the structure bears a navigational light as a warning to traffic to Silloth Docks.


Carlisle, Cumberland.
In 1840 the port of Carlisle had a lighthouse, together with keeper's accommodation, placed at the end of the pier. Its history is not well documented although its life was short and it no longer exists.